Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Clayton State School of Business to Offer MBA Prep Class Starting October 24

The Clayton State School of Business will offer an MBA Prep Course on four Saturdays starting on Oct. 24.

The cost of the course is just $50, plus the cost of two GMAT books. The classes will meet from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7 and Nov. 14 in room B-11 of the University’s Lecture Hall on the main campus in Morrow.

Applications for the MBA Pep Course are available at www.business.clayton.edu/mba. Registrations will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dr. Michael Tidwell, director of the Clayton State MBA program, states that the interest in offering such a course, which was previously held in August 2009, has been strong.

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia recently gave its approval to Clayton State’s proposal to establish a cohort of the MBA program at the Rockdale Career Academy, 1064 Culpepper Dr., Conyers, Ga., starting in January 2010. The Clayton State MBA program, which graduated its first degree-holders this past May, is already operating with cohorts based on the main campus in Morrow, and the University’s instructional site, Clayton State – Fayette, in Peachtree City.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Majority Leader Rogers Joins Governor Jeb Bush in Addressing Excellence in Action Education Summit

Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers (R-Woodstock) will be a featured legislator at the Excellence in Action summit held Oct. 8 and 9 in Washington, D.C. Sen. Rogers will be joining summit host Gov. Jeb Bush and many other reform-minded policymakers working to close the gap in the international race for knowledge.

“Education is the cornerstone to personal success and a strong economic future. I am honored to represent my constituents, and the citizens of Georgia, at this prestigious and important event,” said Sen. Rogers. “The tools gained from this summit will be invaluable for students, educators and parents as we work to shake-up the status quo and make Georgia the home to world-class education. Doing what we have always done, is simply not acceptable. We must empower parents, not government, in making educational decisions for children.”

Excellence in Action is a comprehensive, multi-faceted program designed to ignite a movement for education reform in the United States. The objective of the Excellence in Action initiatives is to provide a roadmap for education reform for local, state and federal leaders across the nation, creating a one-stop-shop to arm policymakers with the tools to achieve successful, battle-tested reform.

“Improving the quality of education in America is the economic and moral imperative of our era,” said Jeb Bush, Chairman of the Foundation for Excellence in Education. “Republicans and Democrats should act on reforms where there is common ground. A generation awaits our leadership.”

Gov. Bush founded the Foundation for Excellence in Education in 2007 and now serves as President and Chairman of the Board. During his two terms as Governor of Florida, Bush championed major reform of education. Florida raised academic standards, required accountability in public schools and created the most ambitious school choice program in the nation.

The 2009 agenda focuses on expanding and replicating the strategies successfully raising student performance – and abolishing the unsuccessful ones. Marquee events include international conversations on high standards, teacher quality and parental choice and a blockbuster presentation on transforming education through technology.

The summit will be attended by more than 400 legislators and educational leaders from around the nation.
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Monday, September 28, 2009

IMPACT Year 2: Science, Math and Fun

he second year of the successful University of West Georgia IMPACT program is set to begin this weekend on Friday, Oct. 2, and Saturday, Oct. 3, with a science demonstration at the Technology-enhanced Learning Center, room 1305.

Improving Motivation, Performance, and Attitudes of Children and Teachers or IMPACT is a grant-funded program that helps children and educators get excited about math and science by hands-on learning that encourages creative thinking and problem solving skills.

Mad Georgia Tech Scientist Dr. A will kick off IMPACT Year 2 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday with a demonstration of his Sensational Science. He will show off his science prowess with the properties of super cool cryogenics, which is liquid nitrogen that measures a negative 321 degrees, the hot fire tornado, the bang of the Binaca cannon, Newton's Laws and other exciting experiments.

The 90-minute program continues for two more performances on Saturday at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Registration is ongoing and costs $1 for children and $2 for adults. Arriving 15 minutes early is recommended. To register and for more information on IMPACT and the weekend presentations, go to https://uwgagenda.westga.edu/impact101.html.

IMPACT Year 2 will also host Saturday camps.

This year, Saturday Science and Math Camps for K-8 students will be hosted from Oct. 31 through April and finish with an awards ceremony in May. The camps offer a wide range of fun and educational courses in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to children and educators for a registration fee of $5.

All sessions will be led by knowledgeable university scientists, experienced science educators and passionate students who are committed to enhancing teaching and learning of science and mathematics in the West Georgia region. To view the camp schedule, go to https://uwgagenda.westga.edu/impact101.html.

In 2008, the Alice Huffard Richards Fund granted $100,000 for one year for the IMPACT program. At the end of the first year, an evaluation determined that the program successfully met its goals and was renewed for a two-year cycle at $100,000 per year for a possible funding of up to $300,000. The grant is administered through the Community Foundation of West Georgia.

UWG Professors Sharmistha Basu Dutt, associate professor of chemistry and director of Engineering Studies, and Gail Marshall, assistant professor of curriculum and instruction, are coordinators of the grant program.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Clayton State Celebrates 40th Anniversary on Sept. 30

Clayton State University first opened its doors to students on Sept. 30, 1969. Richard Nixon was in the White House. The Braves were in first place. And Dr. Harry S. Downs was in the president’s office of the newest unit of the University System of Georgia USG).

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of that historic occasion, Clayton State faculty, staff and students will gather in the University quad on Wednesday, Sept. 30 for the annual Hot Dog Rally of the Faculty/Staff Fund Drive.

The Hot Dog Rally, featuring hot dogs, chips and drinks for all plus music, Clayton State trivia and door prizes, will run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. behind the James M. Baker Center.

The Annual Faculty/Staff Fund Drive, this year entitled “Give a Little, Get a Latte,” began on Thursday, Sept. 10, 2009, and will run through Oct. 9, 2009.

Clayton State has a tradition of extraordinary support for the work of the University through thoughtful giving. As has been the case over the years, nearly 100 percent of the faculty and staff participate in the annual Faculty/Staff Fund Drive. This outstanding accomplishment sends a powerful message — that the faculty and staff believe in Clayton State and support its mission of student, faculty and staff learning.

Clayton Junior College first welcomed 942 students in 1969. Since Downs opened Clayton State as a junior college, there have been two more presidents, two interim presidents, and three name changes. Four-year status – as Clayton State College – was granted by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia in 1986, and University status – as Clayton College & State University – in 1996. The present name was adopted in May 2005.

When Downs retired in January 1994, Dr. Richard A. Skinner became president. When Skinner left in July 1999 to head up the USG’s Georgia GLOBE initiative, Michael F. Vollmer stepped in as interim president for a year, after which Dr. Thomas K. Harden served as the University’s third president from July 2000 to June 2009. After Harden was appointed chancellor of the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay, Dr. Thomas J. “Tim” Hynes, Jr., was named interim president, starting in May 2009. Hynes will preside at Wednesday’s event.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Lexus and Scholastic to Award $500,000 in Grants and Scholarships

/PRNewswire/ -- Since launching in 2007, the Lexus Eco Challenge has inspired and empowered more than 8,500 middle and high school students to learn about the environment and take a stand to improve it. From educating the community about the benefits of solar ovens to producing bio-fuel from used fast food oil, students across the country have tackled a wide range of topics and issues. Students are once again invited to participate in the third annual Lexus Eco Challenge for a chance to win part of $500,000 in grants and scholarships.

The Challenge has two distinct elements:
-- Standards-based supplementary educational materials - encourages
teachers to integrate creative lesson plans into their classrooms to
help teach students about the environment.

-- Competition to reward environmental action - helps young people apply
what they've learned in class through the program and empowers them to
make improvements in their community by participating in the
environmental team challenges.

"We're anxious to see what this third year brings," said Mark Templin, Lexus group vice president and general manager. "The competition is getting tougher as we see the teams working harder to plan and implement innovative, creative and effective programs. It's clear that the Lexus Eco Challenge is making a difference, and it's encouraging to know that we're inspiring the next generation to become responsible stewards of the environment."

The Challenges and Rewards

The Lexus Eco Challenge registration opens on Sept. 28, 2009, and will conclude with the announcement of the first-place and grand-prize-winning teams during Earth Month, April 2010. Middle and high school teams, comprised of 5-10 students and one teacher advisor, are invited to participate in one or both of the two initial challenges, each addressing different environmental elements - land/water and air/climate.

For each of the challenges, teams will define an environmental issue that is important to them, develop an action plan to address the issue, implement the plan, and report the results. Submission deadlines are: Challenge #1 (Land/Water) - Nov. 6, 2009 and Challenge #2 (Air/Climate) - Jan. 19, 2010.

Each of the challenges will have 16 winning teams - eight middle school and eight high school teams. The winning teams will each receive a total of $10,000 in scholarships and grants to be shared among the students, teacher and school. In addition, the winning action plans will be featured on a special Web page to inspire other students to take action in their communities.

In mid-February, the winning teams from the first two challenges will be invited to participate in the Final Challenge. Teams will be asked to reach beyond the local community and inspire environmental action around the world through innovative ideas that are communicated to a wide audience. From the Final Challenge entries, 14 first-place teams and two grand-prize-winning teams will be selected. Each of the 14 first-place teams will receive a total of $15,000 in grants and scholarships, and the two grand-prize-winning teams will each receive $30,000. The money will be shared by the students, their teacher advisors and their schools.

Judging Criteria

All entries for the initial two challenges will be judged on a variety of criteria, including the overall action plan and team effort, the quality of writing, and supporting materials. A select panel of judges will consider questions such as: does the action plan show the team's clear understanding of the environmental issue; does the action plan clearly describe the results; does the action plan communicate a persuasive argument; and does the action plan communicate team effort?

Full program information including rules and entry details can be viewed at www.scholastic.com/lexus .

Teaching Tools for the Classroom

The Lexus Eco Challenge educational materials developed with Scholastic are designed to align with national teaching standards for science, social studies, civics and language arts.

In addition to providing teachers with the information necessary to participate in the challenges, the Web site (www.scholastic.com/lexus) also has extensive tools for them to use in their classrooms. For each challenge, the Web site has lesson plans and teacher instructions including questions to help guide a discussion about the current challenge topic, facts about the topic, and guidelines for a specific classroom project.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Monday, September 21, 2009

University of West Georgia Cancel Classes Because of Flooding

There are 19 roads in Carroll County that are currently closed or severely damaged. Carroll County emergency management officials are encouraging people to stay inside this evening.

No decision has been made yet on Tuesday's classes.Check http://www.westga.edu/ for updates.

GSU offers scholarships for next generation of rehabilitation counselors

Georgia State University was recently awarded a $750,000 federal grant to train the next generation of vocational rehabilitation counselors, helping to reduce a nationwide shortage in the field.

The grant will pay the educational expenses for graduate students who, upon graduation, are willing to work for a publicly funded agency that assists individuals with disabilities in finding employment.

The funding will support nine full-time graduate students each year for five years who will study in the rehabilitation counseling program, provided by the College of Education’s Department of Counseling and Psychological Services. The scholarships will be awarded starting this fall through GSU’s Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling Scholars Program.

“There is a chronic shortage as well as a huge number of professional rehabilitation counselors retiring; this will do something to address the national shortage,” said Professor Roger Weed, coordinator of the Rehabilitation Counseling Program.

A rehabilitation counselor assists individuals with disabilities to achieve their personal, career and independent living goals in the most integrated settings possible.

The grant was awarded to Georgia State’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, in collaboration with the College of Education. It is the second award to Georgia State, following a five year award given in 2004.

The Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling Scholars Program at Georgia State is more than just a scholarship, said Deon Locklin, director of the Public and Performance Management Group in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, who co-directs the program with Weed.

“Students are matched with practicing counselors who serve as mentors throughout their program of study,” Locklin said. “They have field experiences with actual rehabilitation clients. We assist with their placement as they near graduation. It’s a comprehensive program that reflects a strong partnership between the university and the public sector.”

The shortage of qualified rehabilitation counselors working in the public vocational rehabilitation sector has reached critical heights. In Georgia alone, 14 percent of counselor positions in the Department of Labor’s vocational rehabilitation program remain open, according to Locklin’s research. This need will be exacerbated as baby boomers age out and retire.

In order to be eligible for the scholarship, candidates must already be admitted to GSU’s Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling graduate program. For each full-time academic year funded by this scholarship, the scholar must work two years in this field. No more than four years will be required for a two-year master's program.

For more information about Georgia State’s Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling graduate program, visit http://education.gsu.edu/main/2506.htm. More information on the Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling Scholars Program is available at http://www.ppmgsu.org/RSA-Scholars.html.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia

Friday, September 18, 2009

Georgia Tech to Transform Unemployed Technology Workers into High School Computing Teachers

(BUSINESS WIRE)--In today’s economy, unemployment rates have spiked and out-of-work professionals are forced to either join the thousands looking for jobs or seek new career paths. Through a recent $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Georgia Tech College of Computing will mitigate the stress of joblessness for unemployed information technology (IT) professionals over the next three years. Operation Reboot, as the project is aptly titled, will transform an initial set of 30 IT workers in Georgia into high school computing teachers. The initiative began September 1.

Operation Reboot will combine Georgia Tech's innovative high school computing teacher training program and the successful Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program (GaTAPP) to pair an IT worker with an existing computing teacher. They will co-teach at least two computing classes for one year, allowing the IT professional to learn the ins and outs of a classroom and the teacher to get an education in IT. Simultaneously, the IT worker will receive an initial teaching certificate and a computer science endorsement, a special area of expertise for teachers to add on to their certification.

“A teacher's motivation, self efficacy, job satisfaction and commitment to teaching are closely linked with their professional identity,” Barbara Ericson, Director of Computing Outreach at the College of Computing and principal investigator for Operation Reboot, said. “Through the teacher workshops at Georgia Tech, courses needed for certification, co-teaching and mentoring we will transform these IT worker's identity into that of a computing teacher.”

Operation Reboot ultimately aims to improve the computing education of 4,600 students over the next three years by increasing the number of well trained computing teachers and the number of computing classes being offered. By creating highly engaging curricular materials, improving the content and educational knowledge of computing teachers, Georgia Tech expects the number of students receiving a computing education to increase by at least 30 percent. This is especially important for the economy and students interested in computing careers, as jobs in the field are expected to be some of the fastest growing through 2016.

With computing a critical component of every American business, the need for innovative, skilled IT professionals is more vital than ever. The demand for IT professionals, as predicted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, is not currently being met by computer science enrollments in American universities and the United States still faces a tough challenge in remaining competitive in overall science and technology education.

Georgia Tech will publish results of the project and share materials with other states to serve as a model on how to successfully transform unemployed IT workers into high school computing teachers.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Sallie Mae and Gallup Research Reveals Families of All Incomes Are Saving For College Yet Most Fall Short of Goals

(BUSINESS WIRE)--Families of low and modest incomes who are saving for college save as much or more as a percentage of income as families in higher income brackets, says a new study released today from Sallie Mae and Gallup. On average, parents who save for college earmark 3.6 percent of annual income for their child’s education, while households earning under $50,000 set aside 7.5 percent of their annual income. Based on a nationally representative survey of more than 1,200 parents of children under age 18, “How America Saves for College” identified savings habits and motivators to encourage more families to save.

However, only 29 percent of families are on track to reach their savings goal. The study estimates that parents would need to save an average of 5.7 percent of income annually to meet their self-defined goal by the time their child goes to college.

“The urgency of addressing college affordability has never been felt so strongly across the full spectrum of American families,” said Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock. “We are fast approaching an era in which our retirees will be better educated than our workforce—backwards momentum that we must reverse in order to reclaim our leadership position on the world stage. These survey numbers suggest that saving for higher education has become a high priority for the nation, and we should encourage that commitment by providing creative solutions and support for families of all income levels.”

Among the study’s additional findings:

* Parents of children 12 and under are more likely than parents of teens to have saved. On average, parents began saving when their oldest child was almost three years old.
* Families saved an average of $2,676 for college annually, for an average total of $13,827.
* Parents cited employer matching as the top motivator (66%) that would encourage them to save for college, followed by tax benefits (44%). In addition, 25 percent indicated that a shopping rewards program would motivate them to save for college.
* 529 college savings plans are gaining popularity, particularly among families with younger children. While the overall 529 usage rate for savers was 33 percent, parents with children under age seven are twice as likely to turn to 529 plans (43%) as parents of teens (20%).
* Regardless of the parents’ income level or child’s age when parents began saving, the total amount saved increases steadily the longer that dedicated savings vehicles are used. Parents of any income level who had saved seven years or more accumulated two to three times the savings as parents in corresponding income levels who saved for shorter periods of time.
* Families in the Northeast have saved the most with an average savings of $15,846 closely followed by the West with $15,589. The South has an average savings of $13,722 and the Midwest has the lowest with an average of $9,693.

“President Obama has set a goal of achieving the highest proportion of students graduating from college in the world by 2020,” said Albert L. Lord, vice chairman and CEO, Sallie Mae, the nation’s leading saving, planning, and paying for education company. “Students spend 12 years preparing academically, but too many families overlook the need to prepare financially. Even a little bit of savings set aside regularly over time can go a long way toward opening the doors to a college education.”

Sallie Mae helps families plan, save, and pay for college through its Upromise program, which has helped families earn $500 million in college savings rewards, and by administering 529 college savings plans, which offer tax-advantaged ways to save. To help families develop a saving for college plan, Sallie Mae also offers its free online tool, Education Investment Planner (www.SallieMae.com/invest), which enables families to project the total cost of college factoring in the child’s age, type of institution, and the historical rate of increase in tuition.

“How America Saves for College” is part of a series conducted by Sallie Mae and Gallup on how families save and pay for college, and the full report is available at www.SallieMae.com/howAmericasaves.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Bill Would End U.S. Subsidy For Lenders of College Aid

The federal government would end its four-decade practice of subsidizing private lenders that make college loans under a bill the House took up Wednesday that would steer tens of billions of dollars in savings to student aid over the next decade.

Republicans and the lending industry say the bill would engineer a risky shift in higher-education finance that could prove costly to taxpayers and diminish quality of service to borrowers. But Democrats and the Obama administration say the government could save an estimated $80 billion by ending a subsidy system that they contend benefits banks rather than students... click link to continue reading:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/16/AR2009091603001.html?wpisrc=newsletter&wpisrc=newsletter&wpisrc=newsletter

Harris Corporation Commits $2 Million to Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

/PRNewswire/ -- Harris Corporation (NYSE:HRS) , an international communications and information technology company, has signed an agreement to make a $2 million donation to the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). The gift, made through the Harris Foundation, will help support a capital campaign for construction of a new ECE headquarters and the renovation of the school's 47-year-old Van Leer Building, where some 7,000 students receive instruction each year.

Harris will donate $500,000 each year for four years beginning in 2010 -- the anticipated completion date of the Georgia Tech Foundation's private fund drive for the new facilities. Specifically, the Harris gift is intended for construction of an auditorium or other similar space. Harris has a decades-long partnership with Georgia Tech and its School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, which is the largest producer of electrical and computer engineers by degree in the nation. The company employs nearly 200 of the school's graduates.

Howard L. Lance, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Harris, and Dr. G.P. "Bud" Peterson, president of Georgia Tech, signed an agreement for the donation during a special ceremony at the Harris Customer Briefing Center in Melbourne, Florida. The event also included a reception attended by Harris employees who are Georgia Tech graduates and by other representatives from the university.

"While it may be tempting for corporations to reduce educational support during challenging economic times, at Harris we believe that this is exactly the right time to invest in our company's future by supporting excellent schools like Georgia Tech, whose graduates have helped make Harris a national and global leader in the communications and information technology sectors," said Lance. "Our investments in education and university partnerships pay dividends many times over."

"Our faculty and students are currently scattered across 10 buildings around the campus, the Van Leer classrooms are outdated, and the building lacks adequate laboratory facilities," said Dr. Gary S. May, professor and Steve W. Chaddick School Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, who attended the check presentation. "Clearly, this generous lead gift from Harris Corporation provides significant momentum for the school's long-term capital needs and helps to create a new presence that will serve us well in the 21st Century."

In addition to the $2 million gift announced today, Harris has donated some $280,000 to the university since 2006. This includes a five-year, $250,000 pledge for a research lab in the Nanotechnology Research Center, and another $30,000 to support various programs within the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

UGA family researchers receive $5.9 million grant

University of Georgia researchers have been awarded a five-year, $5.9 million Core Center of Excellence grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to address the ways genetic predispositions combine with family and community environments to forecast drug use, drug abuse and risky sexual behavior among children, adolescents and young adults.

The principal investigator is Gene H. Brody, Regents’ Professor Emeritus of Child and Family Development in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences and director of the Center for Family Research. Co-principal investigators are Steven R.H. Beach, director of the UGA Institute for Behavioral Research and Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology, and Steven M. Kogan, assistant professor of child and family development.

The CCOE will bring together a team of molecular and statistical geneticists, genetic epidemiologists and scientists specializing in prevention, public health and human development. Participating researchers are at the University of Georgia, Emory University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Iowa.

The grant will allow Brody and his fellow researchers to build on longitudinal, epidemiological research that dates back more than two decades. In that original research, Brody and his colleagues identified young people who were at risk for engaging in drug use, drug abuse, and risky sexual behavior. They also identified specific parenting practices and community characteristics that served to minimize the incidence of young people’s engagement in risky behavior.

Recently, Brody and his colleagues have begun to study the role genes play in the development of these risky behaviors. This research has begun to identify candidate genes that forecast increases in substance use and behavior problems among youth, as well as ways in which participation in prevention programs can override genetic risks.

The ultimate goal of the Center of Excellence, Brody said, “is to increase the efficacy of prevention programs by developing a better understanding of how genes and social environments interact to influence youths’ initiation and escalation of substance use and risky behaviors.”

More information on the UGA Center for Family Research is available at http://www.cfr.uga.edu/.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

2009 National Blue Ribbon Schools Named

Seven Georgia public schools were named 2009 National Blue Ribbon Schools today.

"These seven schools are outstanding examples of how high expectations and hard work can lead to outstanding student achievement," said State Superintendent of Schools Kathy Cox. "These schools show that, regardless of a school's size, geography or demographics, all students can achieve at high levels."

The No Child Left Behind Blue Ribbon Schools award distinguishes and honors schools for helping students achieve at very high levels and for making significant progress in closing the achievement gap.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the National Blue Ribbon School award winners this morning. (See U.S. Department of Education Release -
http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2009/09/09152009.html)

Blue Ribbon Schools are chosen in one of three categories (See the full criteria descriptions - http://tinyurl.com/NationalBlueRibbonCriteria)

- TOP 10%: Schools that scored in the top 10 percent in student achievement.

- TOP 10%: (40% Disadvantaged): Schools that scored in the top 10 percent in student achievement AND have at least 40 percent of its students considered economically disadvantaged.

- GREATEST GAINS: Schools with at least 40 percent economically disadvantaged students that have dramatically improved student achievement to high levels.

Five Georgia private schools also were named National Blue Ribbon schools. The selection process for private schools is different. For more information, go to http://www.capenet.org/brs.html.

Georgia's winning schools will join other national winners at an awards ceremony on November 3 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.

For more information on the Blue Ribbon Schools program, go to the Blue Ribbon Schools website at http://www.ed.gov/programs/nclbbrs/awards.html.

2009 GEORGIA BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS

Public
- Alice Coachman Elementary School, Dougherty County
- Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary School, Atlanta Public Schools
- DeKalb School of the Arts, DeKalb County
- Hightower Trail Middle School, Cobb County
- Honey Creek Elementary School, Rockdale County
- Trion High School, Trion City Schools
- Tunnel Hill Elementary School, Whitfield County

Private
- Holy Redeemer Catholic School, Johns Creek
- Holy Spirit Preparatory School, Atlanta
- Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic School, Atlanta
- Our Lady of Victory Catholic School, Tyrone
- St. Francis Xavier Catholic School, Brunswick
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Monday, September 14, 2009

Emory Launches Graduate Program in Bioethics

Emory University is launching a new master of arts degree program in bioethics, which will provide advanced interdisciplinary study for professionals and students interested in the social and ethical challenges facing medicine and the life sciences.

“I am very pleased to be launching our master's program in bioethics," says Paul Root Wolpe, director of Emory's Center for Ethics, which is the academic home of the program.

"We have designed the program to give the students a thorough grounding in bioethics while providing hands-on experience in institutions like the Centers for Disease Control, NASA, the Health Care Ethics Consortium of Georgia, and Emory’s superb medical, nursing, public health, law, business and theology schools," says Wolpe. "The program is so innovative and exciting I wish I could take it myself.”

“We are excited to add a master’s degree in bioethics,” says Lisa A. Tedesco, vice provost and dean of Emory's James T. Laney School of Graduate Studies. “The program reflects our strong commitment to scholarship that engages difficult problems and contributes to the public good, and it resonates deeply with the expertise, experience and resources available at Emory. We are grateful to Kathy Kinlaw, associate director of the Center for Ethics, and her team for leading the creation of this new degree program, and to Paul Root Wolpe for the vision and leadership he has brought to the Center.”

“Graduates of Emory’s master's in bioethics program will be trained to help advance the national conversation on important issues influencing public policy, scholarship, practice and education in the field,” says Kinlaw, who also directs the Center’s program in health sciences and ethics.

Faculty of the Center for Ethics who are teaching in the program include scholars and practitioners in a variety of disciplines, such as medicine, nursing, public health, law, theology, business, the life sciences, philosophy, religion, sociology and psychology.

Courses in the new program began this fall with six students enrolled in the inaugural class. The program anticipates strong interdisciplinary interest as recruitment for fall 2010 begins.

For more information on Emory's new bioethics master's degree program, contact Kinlaw at 404-727-2201.


-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Friday, September 11, 2009

Clayton State University School of Nursing Expands Simulation Lab

The School of Nursing (SoN) at Clayton State University is expanding the student learning experience by adding a new lab space in Clayton Hall and expanding the simulation lab in the Harry S. Downs Center.

“Because of the nursing shortage, we have increased our enrollment over the last few years so we can graduate more nurses to increase the nursing workforce. We have outgrown our present lab so we are excited about the new additional space which will allow us to expand student learning experiences,” says Katrina Barnes, R.N., M.S., clinical assistant professor of Nursing and lab coordinator.

The simulation lab is welcoming a new state of the art manikin funded through a grant and student lab fees. The SoN has been able to create another “hospital room” in the lab which will accommodate a labor and delivery unit. New video equipment has been installed allowing students to perform simulations in all three rooms at the same time with different classes.

Clayton Hall will now house the health assessment portion of the lab. That lab will include exam tables and equipment used for the physical assessment of all body systems.

“We can now have health assessment labs any time on Tuesday and Wednesday, which we couldn’t do before because it was needed for the other clinical classes. Moving the Health Assessment portion of the lab will allow students increased practice times on Monday and Thursday in the CE lab area so they can review skills they have learned in their regular clinical courses,” says Barnes.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

University System of GA Receives $27.3M Through ARRA to Fund Energy-Conservation Projects

The University System of Georgia (USG) has received funding under the State Facilities Retrofit Program to fund 71 energy-conservation measures totaling $27.3 million at 25 colleges and universities across the state. The Georgia Environmental Facilities Authority (GEFA) is providing the funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

The energy-conservation measures to be funded consist of lighting retrofits, mechanical/HVAC upgrades and installation of control systems in classrooms, libraries, science buildings and other state-owned facilities.

Sub-metering and re-commissioning are also key components of the program. “Over time, building energy systems can become unbalanced and inefficient, and must be re-commissioned or ‘tuned up’ to operate as originally designed,” said Sandra Neuse, the USG’s assistant vice chancellor for compliance and operations. “In addition, older buildings are typically not individually metered for utilities, so addition of a sub-meter is critical in order to measure and monitor ongoing energy usage and to verify gains from energy improvements.”

Neuse added that the University System is “deeply grateful to Georgia Environmental Facilities Authority for the stimulus funding we’ve received, which will enable us to complete these important projects and reduce our overall energy usage by millions of BTU’s over the next few years.”

Since 2007, increasing energy efficiency in the University System of Georgia’s colleges and universities has been the focus of a system-wide initiative that supports one of the Board of Regents’ strategic goals – to operate more efficiently as a system.

“Even as student enrollment increases, the USG is continually looking for ways to reduce energy consumption in its buildings on a square-foot basis and is committed to meeting the goals of the Governor’s Energy Challenge and achieving ‘best in class’ energy-usage measures,” Neuse said.

The funded projects will conserve almost 344,000 million BTUs annually for an estimated savings of $6 million in utilities costs while achieving other key objectives of the ARRA such as job creation/retention, the support of green industries, and environmental stewardship.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Robinson to launch Executive Master’s in Finance

Beginning in January 2010, Georgia State University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business will offer an Executive Master of Science in Finance with a specialization in corporate finance. It will be the first such program offered in Atlanta.

Designed for rising as well as mid-career finance professionals who seek to expand or update their functional knowledge, Robinson’s Executive MS-Finance is a one-year, three-semester program. Class size will be limited and students will proceed as a cohort-a structure that fosters peer learning and collaboration.

“We developed the Executive Master of Science in Finance in response to market demand for an accelerated degree program in finance,” said Jane. F. Mutchler, Robinson associate dean for academic planning and programs.

“A traditional master’s program takes, at minimum, two years to complete,” said Mutchler. “In today’s uncertain and changing economic environment, many professionals want to shorten the time it takes to complete their studies in order to apply their knowledge and acumen more rapidly.”

The rigorous, 30-hour curriculum was created and will be taught by the faculty of Robinson College’s Department of Finance. Renowned for their broad experience in research, executive education and practice, they also teach in the college’s top-10-ranked MBA program for working professionals.

Robinson’s Executive MS-Finance will be offered at Georgia State’s Executive Education Center in Buckhead and will meet every Monday evening, every other Wednesday evening and three Saturday mornings per semester. Applicants should possess four or more years of full-time work experience during which they have demonstrated potential for managerial advancement. They must also hold a four-year undergraduate degree. For additional information, please visit http://robinson.gsu.edu/finance/execms.htm.

The largest business school in the South and part of a major research institution, the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University is located in Atlanta, an epicenter of business and a gateway to the world. With programs on four continents and students from 150 countries, the college is both worldwide and world class. Its part-time MBA program is ranked number seven in the nation and has been in the top 10 for 14 consecutive years. The college has 200 faculty, 7,400 students and 65,000 alumni.

Noted for an emphasis on educating leaders, the Robinson College of Business and Georgia State University have produced more of Georgia's top executives with graduate degrees than any other school in the nation.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Emory Launches Mentoring for Careers in Health

Emory has launched a PreHealth Mentoring Office this fall, designed to provide support and guidance to undergraduates planning to go on to medical school or other advanced studies in the field of health.

“This office will play a strategic advisory role — helping students identify their strengths and interests and to develop their passions,” says Preetha Ram, assistant dean of science in the Office of Undergraduate Education. “By providing mentorship as early as possible in their college careers, we can help students achieve better than expected results.”

For 2009-10, the primary focus will be on second-year students. In addition to advising students, the goals include creating community among prehealth students and expanding their opportunities to do internships, research and study abroad programs, and to shadow physicians and other health professionals.

A new Web site, www.emory.edu/ prehealth, provides links to events and other information.

Ram is serving as director of the PreHealth Mentoring Office, with the support of Paul Fowler, executive director of the Career Center, and Peter Sederberg, special assistant to the Office of the Provost.

“This is a pure partnership between the College, the Career Center and the Provost’s office,” says Fowler. “There has been growing interest in how to serve the prehealth population of students, because there are so many students interested, and it’s getting increasingly competitive.”

More than 500 students in the class of 2013 have declared themselves as prehealth majors, including a range of medical fields. About 200 students within every Emory class plan to apply to medical school. In November of 2008, Emory College Dean Bobby Paul assigned a task force to find ways to help support the efforts of these students to get accepted into top-tier medical schools.

The first goal of the task force was to launch a composite letter of recommendation process. The composite letter provides a cover letter for multiple letters of recommendation, summing up the accomplishments of a student in a format geared specifically for medical school applications.

After the composite letter process got up and rolling last spring, the task force began focusing on development of a PreHealth Mentoring Office. A series of undergraduate dialogues organized by Senior Vice Provost Santa Ono “were instrumental in raising awareness of the need for advising for pre-med students,” Ram says, adding that the dialogues “convinced those present, including Provost Earl Lewis, Dean Paul and Vice President for Campus Life John Ford of the need for immediate action.”

President Jim Wagner also supported the drive to create the office, and plans moved forward, guided by the input of students, faculty and administrators, from the college and the medical school.

“I think the PreHealth Mentoring Office is a fantastic idea that will help a lot of students,” says Lauren Spiegel, a senior pre-med major in the Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology program. As a freshman, Spiegel became involved in a mentoring program known as INSPIRE (Interdisciplinary Science Program for Integrating Research into Education), and she was among the students who helped make the composite letter program and the PreHealth Mentoring Office a reality.

“I’m really pleased that our research and efforts are paying off and it’s getting under way,” Spiegel says. “I think it’s really important for students to vouch for what we want, and to get involved in making positive changes happen. It’s exciting to have these opportunities to make an impact at Emory.”

By Carol Clark

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

UGA’s Terry College of Business to offer continuing education courses in Project Management Certification with instructional partner Advanced Strategi

The University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business will offer a strategic Project Management Certificate in Leadership, Planning and Execution at the Terry Executive Education Center in Atlanta, beginning in October.

The nine-day, three-course executive program offers managers the opportunity to learn how to consistently initiate, plan and execute major projects with the potential to transform how their companies do business.

Terry’s Office of Executive Programs is teaming with Advanced Strategies Inc. to teach managers how to achieve better results in areas such as day-to-day leadership, business accountability, dynamic planning, strategic alignment, critical thinking and focused execution.

“We are delighted to be working with a top organization like Advanced Strategies,” said Charlie Squires, director of executive programs at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. “Our institution is seeing increased demand for project management courses, as individuals face strong competition for fewer available jobs, and companies struggle to do more with less and still make a profit. Through this partnership we are able to combine the best of both worlds – the latest in theory and best practices – to deliver real-world value.”

The three courses are:
· Project Management: Initiation and Launch, which covers defining expected outcomes, aligning with strategic goals and dealing with people and politics;
· Project Management: Planning, which covers process visualization, effective scheduling and commitment of resources;
· Project Management: Execution, which covers project oversight, managing risk and leading vs. managing.

Courses will be offered Oct. 6-8, Nov. 3-5 and Dec. 8-10. The Initiation and Launch course and the Planning course can also be taken independently.

With offices in Atlanta and St. Paul, Minn., Advanced Strategies is a PMI Endorsed Global Education Provider and ensures that each course aligns with PMI knowledge areas. Participants must earn 63 contact hours and 6.3 Continuing Education Units to earn Project Management Certification.

The faculty who will be teaching in the program have considerable experience leading projects for Fortune 500 companies and large government agencies. Edward L. Wynn, who is a certified Project Management Professional, has been with Advanced Strategies for 15 years and has managed many successful IT projects. Karen Windham, who joined Advance Strategies in 1990, has 25 years of information management and project management experience.

The cost for the program is $1,995 per course or $5,500 if purchasing all three courses in advance. Any organization registering two or more participants receives a 10 percent discount.

For complete course descriptions or to register, go to the Executive Program’s Project Management Web site. All classes will be held at the Terry Executive Education Center in the Buckhead district of Atlanta, located in the One Live Oak Building, 3475 Lenox Road. For more information, call toll-free 1-866-238-0756 or executive_programs@terry.uga.edu.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Superintendent Cox Launches New Teacher Tools

PBS TeacherLine and Verizon Thinkfinity Save Time and Money

State Superintendent of Schools Kathy Cox launched two online teacher tools this morning that will save educators and school systems time and money.

"These resources were developed without spending any taxpayer dollars and will help our teachers provide a world-class education to all of our students," Superintendent Cox said. "Time and money are precious commodities, especially in these times, and these teacher tools will help save both."

At an event at Kennesaw Mountain High School in Cobb County, Superintendent Cox announced expanded state partnerships with Georgia Public Broadcasting/PBS TeacherLine and Verizon's Thinkfinity.

"We have partnered with two outstanding organizations to bring high-quality resources to our classroom teachers," Superintendent Cox said. "We will continue to look for opportunities to provide valuable tools to our educators at little or no cost to the taxpayers of Georgia.”

PBS TeacherLine

PBS TeacherLine is an online tool that offers low-cost, high-quality professional development classes to teachers so they can improve their abilities and earn the Professional Learning Units -- or PLUs -- they need to maintain their certification.

"The Georgia Department of Education has reviewed PBS TeacherLine's English language arts and mathematics classes and given them our stamp of approval," Superintendent Cox said. "These classes are well-aligned with our state standards and the high expectations we have for teachers in Georgia."

Marilyn Stansbury, director of education for Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), said this is just the beginning of this partnership.

"We will continue to work together to find ways we can provide high-quality, low-cost professional development opportunities for Georgia teachers," Ms. Stansbury said. "We are excited to launch this new partnership with the Georgia Department of Education and the state's educators."

Superintendent Cox said school systems can use federal Title 1 or stimulus funds to pay for educators to take TeacherLine classes. More information will be sent to schools this week.

- To learn more about PBS TeacherLine, visit www.gpb.org/education and click on "PBS TeacherLine" or go to http://www.teacherlinesoutheast.org/.

- A list of GaDOE-endorsed classes is attached to this email.

Verizon Thinkfinity

Verizon Thinkfinity is a free, online tool that provides more than 55,000 lesson plans, activities and other resources for classroom teachers. The content has been developed in coordination with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Council for Economic Education, the International Reading Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and many other highly-regarded groups.

"Many of the resources in Verizon Thinkfinity are directly linked to the Georgia Performance Standards and can help teachers develop rigorous and relevant lessons for their students quickly and easily," Superintendent Cox said. "Verizon is an outstanding corporate partner for education across the nation, especially here in Georgia."

Verizon began its partnership with Georgia last school year when it donated $50,000 that helped train more than 16,000 teachers on how to use Thinkfinity. On Tuesday, Julie Smith, vice president for external affairs, southeast, presented Superintendent Cox with another $50,000 check from Verizon to continue and expand its partnership.

Verizon Foundation President Patrick Gaston said the Thinkfinity.org website is a great tool for school and home.

“Whether it’s an English teacher looking for resources to spark a love of reading in a student, or a parent seeking a convenient and user-friendly educational activity to stimulate the mind of a young child, Thinkfinity.org will help them quickly and easily find the information needed to improve student achievement,” said Patrick Gaston, president of the Verizon Foundation.
To learn more about Verizon's Thinkfinity, go to www.thinkfinity.org.

Teachers can access Thinkfinity resources directly tied to the Georgia Performance Standards at www.georgiastandards.org.
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Young Harris College Announces Fall Visitation Days

Young Harris College will host two Fall Visitation Days for high school students interested in learning more about Young Harris College. The all-day events designed for high school students and their families are scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 19, and Saturday, Oct. 31. Activities are scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and include information sessions on admissions, financial aid, campus life, campus tours and the opportunity to meet current students and faculty.

To register for a Fall Visitation Day or for more information, contact Kelli Fell in the Office of Admissions at kfell@yhc.edu or 1 (800) 241-3754, or register online.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia

Monday, September 7, 2009

The Legend of Loch

As Clayton State University approaches the 40th anniversary of the day its doors opened to students (that would be Sept. 30, 2009), the University will, from time-to-time, be taking a look back at its past.

Today’s subject -- the University’s mascot, Loch. Just how did a large, green whatever become the mascot of “an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta?” Here’s the Legend of Loch…

In 1969, Clayton Junior College was established and, as part of the original campus, a 12-acre artificial lake was created out of what was originally an old dairy farm. The lake was built in mid-January in the middle of one of the worst winter storms in Atlanta’s history. When the construction crews were digging to make room for the dam that would create the lake, an amazing discovery was found deep below the surface. What looked to be a large piece of rock was actually a large chunk of ice.

With the work picking back up and the huge ice rock lying off to the side, no one noticed that the ice began to crack. One morning, after returning to the dam, the workers were astonished to find the ice had split in two and a hollow inside was left, as if something had hatched from within. Immediately, questions began to arise and concerns shot across the community. “What had been let loose?”… “Should we be afraid?” However, after the initial shock wore off, life on the construction site went back to normal.

Several years passed. The, in 1990, a strange string of occurrences began to happen. Several of the ducks around the campus turned up dead, looking as if some animal had feasted them on. When the campus police checked the film of the duck crime scene, they saw on the tape a large, shadowy creature walking amongst the trees and disappearing into the lake. Rumor spread around the school, and several media outlets clamored to get a piece of the story. Rewards were offered to any student who could capture this beast on film, and anyone who could retrieve this thing alive would be granted immediate completion of a bachelor’s degree.

Over the years since, hundreds of photos and video footage have turned up claiming to feature this famous creature of Clayton State, who has since come to be known as Loch the Laker. While no solid proof has been offered to verify that this creature actually exists, many claim to have encountered Loch, notably former Director of Public Information Jerry Atkins, and former Director of Student Life Rob Taylor, who was once seen scuba diving in the lake, looking for Loch. Based on these accounts, evidence seems to indicate that he is friendly, and just wants to interact with students, faculty and staff. This would explain Loch’s many sightings at soccer and basketball games and several other university functions. Indeed, when the Clayton State intercollegiate athletic program, which is celebrating its 20th year this year as well, began in 1990, Loch was made the Lakers’ mascot.

(Editor’s Note: The preceding “Legend of Loch” is based on a story concocted by the creative talents of the late Robert “Bo’ Bolander, Clayton State’s dean of Students during most of his 32 years at Clayton State. In reality, many noted Clayton State students have worn the Loch costume over the years, including former Bent Tree editor Kevin Dixon and former SGA President Brian Magill. Rumor has it that Associate Dean of Students Jeff Jacobs, during his days as director of Student Life, even took a few turns in the outfit.)
---
Community News You Can Use
Follow us on Twitter: @gafrontpage
www.FayetteFrontPage.com
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
www.PoliticalPotluck.com
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
---

Saturday, September 5, 2009

A Historic Day for West Georgia

Saturday, September 5, is a day that all West Georgia Wolves fans will remember as one that began a new chapter in UWG football. UWG will finally have a place to call home in the 9,500-seat University Stadium, the largest sports venue between Birmingham and Atlanta.

Dr. Beheruz N. Sethna, president of the university, will dedicate University Stadium and acknowledge the many individuals and community support that made the new stadium and Athletics Complex possible.

Those supporters include the Student Government Association, which voted to implement a student fee to help fund the Athletics Complex; the city of Carrollton, which donated several hundred acres of land and assisted with many infrastructure issues; the Carroll County Commission, which used $1 million in SPLOST funds to help with infrastructure; and major donor visionaries Ray Fulford, Bob Stone and Jim Gill, who gave leadership, community support and funds toward a project that was unthinkable 10 years ago.

The half-time show will honor major donors to University Stadium and the Athletics Complex.

Game Day tickets are a cash only purchase at the University Stadium Box Office two hours prior to kickoff. Students, faculty and staff may purchase reserved seats by contacting 678-839-6533 or show ID at the gate for general admission.

For more information on the first home game and the new stadium, go to http://www.uwgsports.com/.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Friday, September 4, 2009

James N. Thompson, M.D., Named Interim President at Medical College of Georgia

University System of Georgia Chancellor Erroll B. Davis Jr. announced August 15 that he has appointed James N. Thompson, M.D., to serve as interim president of the Medical College of Georgia (MCG), Augusta.

Dr. Thompson, an otolaryngologist and former medical school dean who has served as chief executive officer of the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), will join the MCG staff on Oct. 1, 2009, and will transition into the presidency at some point during the month of October, serving in this role until the new permanent president is on board.

A national search is underway to select a new president at MCG, following the departure of its current president, Dr. Daniel W. Rahn, who is the new chancellor of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

“Dr. Thompson’s career encompasses both work at a medical school and on a national level overseeing medical licensing and regulatory boards. He has an excellent understanding of and extensive experience with the rigors and skills of leading a medical research university,” said Davis. “We are fortunate that Dr. Thompson can fill this post at this critical juncture in MCG’s history.”

Dr. Thompson served as president and chief executive officer of the FSMB from 2002 to 2008. The FSMB is a national non-profit association that serves as a collective voice for the 70-member allopathic and osteopathic state medical licensing and regulatory boards in the United States and its territories.

In his FSMB role, Dr. Thompson was the official spokesperson for the organization and represented the nation’s medical boards in public forums related to health regulatory policy. He speaks often about health and medical education policy, professional behavior of physicians, and the role of regulatory authorities in preserving the integrity of the medical profession.

Prior to joining the FSMB, Dr. Thompson was on the faculty of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. During that time he served as dean of the School of Medicine, and Wake Forest University vice president. In 2002, he was named dean emeritus of the School of Medicine.

Dr. Thompson represented the American Medical Association (AMA) on the Executive Committee of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accrediting authority for medical education leading to the M.D. degree in US and Canadian medical schools. He is past chair of the Governing Council of the AMA’s Section on Medical Schools.

Dr. Thompson has received numerous awards from universities and associations related to his work, including the distinguished service award from the National Board of Medical Examiners, the Harris Mosher Award for Excellence in Clinical Research from the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society for research on corrosive esophageal injuries, the 2006 Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from DePauw University, and the 2006 Alumni Achievement Award from The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Dr. Thompson earned his B.A. degree at DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind, and his M.D. degree at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

He and his wife Carol live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area and have four grown children and eight grandchildren.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

In its New College Rankings, Washington Monthly Magazine Asks 'What Do Institutions of Higher Learning Do for the Country?'

/PRNewswire/ -- As an alternative to U.S. News & World Report's much-criticized college rankings, the Washington Monthly magazine today is releasing its own annual College Guide and Rankings. Whereas U.S. News relies on crude and easily manipulated measures of money and prestige, like alumni giving rates and a vague reputational survey, the Washington Monthly ranks schools based on their contributions to society.

To compile the list, the Washington Monthly's editors gathered reams of publicly available data and settled on three criteria: social mobility, research and service. America's best colleges, the editors reasoned, are those that produce new scientific discoveries and highly trained PhDs, help economically disadvantaged students earn degrees, and emphasize the obligations students have to serve their communities and the nation at large.

The Washington Monthly's unique methodology yields strikingly different results:

-- Only one of the U.S. News top 10 universities -- Stanford -- makes the
Washington Monthly's top 10, while high profile institutions such as
Princeton, Duke and the University of Pennsylvania fail to even crack
Washington Monthly's top 25.
-- Some of the top universities on the Washington Monthly list, like
South Carolina State (#6) and Jackson State (#22), are non-elite "red
state" schools buried in the lowest tiers of the U.S. News list.
-- While all the top 20 U.S. News universities are private, 13 of the top
20 Washington Monthly universities are public.
-- The University of California system grabs the top three slots --
including number-one-ranked Berkeley -- even as the state of
California is slashing higher education funding.
-- Women's liberal arts colleges score well in the Washington Monthly
rankings, with Mount Holyoke, Smith, Bryn Mawr and Wellesley all in
the top 10. Historically black institutions, such as Spelman and
Morehouse, also make strong showings.

"Instead of just measuring what colleges can do for you," explains Washington Monthly editor-in-chief Paul Glastris, "we ask 'What are colleges doing for the country?'"

The Washington Monthly's College Guide and Rankings appear in the magazine's September/October issue. They are also available online at a new College Guide Web site the magazine is launching today, http://washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/. The Web site will be devoted to covering higher education reform, a subject the editors believe will emerge as a major political story in the next decade thanks to average tuition prices that are rising faster than health care costs.

Other stories in the latest issue of the Washington Monthly:
-- "College for $99 a Month": Why the next generation of online education
could be great for cash-strapped students, but catastrophic for
traditional universities.
-- "Pie in the Sky": How Domino's Pizza mogul Tom Monaghan built, and
then destroyed, an elite law school.
-- "Higher Ed's Bermuda Triangle": Vast numbers of students enter
community college remedial classes every year, and are never heard
from again.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

750 Student Teams Wanted for World's Largest Rocket Competition

/PRNewswire/ -- Registration for the world's largest rocket competition, the Team America Rocketry Challenge, is open to 750 student teams in grades 7-12 from any U.S. school, home school or non-profit youth organization. Registration for the 2010 spring contest is open now through November 30.

The annual rocket contest, sponsored by AIA, challenges teams of three to 10 students to design and build a rocket that will climb to 825 feet with a raw egg payload and stay aloft for 40 to 45 seconds. The payload must then return to earth unbroken. The 2010 contest rules and registration information are available at www.rocketcontest.org.

"The Team America Rocketry Challenge is fostering the next generation of engineers by sparking an interest in math and physics in a fun, team-based environment," said Marion Blakey, AIA president and CEO. "The students are often mentored by real-world engineers and scientists and many teams are sponsored by AIA member companies. TARC is truly an invaluable educational experience."

AIA sponsors TARC with the National Association of Rocketry, NASA, the Defense Department, the American Association of Physics Teachers and AIA member companies. The contest is in its eighth year and is proving to be the needed catalyst to generate interest in students with the sciences. According to a survey of TARC alumni:

-- 83 percent became more interested in science and math as a result of
TARC.
-- 81 percent gained a better understanding of how math, science, and
technology are used to solve problems in the real world.
-- 70 percent became more interested in a STEM career as a result of
TARC.
-- 67 percent intend to choose a STEM major in college.

The top 100 TARC team finalists are notified on April 9 that they have earned a trip to the competition May 15, just outside of Washington, DC. Student participants compete for $60,000 in prizes, scholarships and a trip to the 2010 international air show in London for an international "Fly-Off" with student teams from France and the UK.

The aerospace industry is actively looking for young people to join its ranks. The industry is facing a future workforce shortage as many employees will reach retirement age in the next decade. A recent Aviation Week and Space Technology survey found that almost 40 percent of the workforce is over the age of 50. For more information on careers in aerospace, visit www.launchintoaerospace.org.

Founded in 1919, the Aerospace Industries Association represents the nation's leading manufacturers and suppliers of civil, military, and business aircraft, helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles, space systems, aircraft engines, materiel, and related components, equipment services, and information technology.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
Follow us on Twitter: @GAFrontPage

Training Nursing Leaders at Georgia State

The Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing at Georgia State University received more than $800,000 in a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration to establish a new master’s degree concentration in Nursing Leadership and Healthcare Innovations. The three year grant provides funding for the development of the program, as well as for faculty and a staff administrator.

The nursing school has already initiated the new concentration, which features optional courses in nursing informatics and nursing leadership, and ten students have enrolled for fall 2009. Georgia State will become the only university in Atlanta to offer the nursing informatics curriculum and the second statewide.

By offering a degree concentration in nursing leadership and informatics, Georgia State is helping to fill a gap in the health care system. As health care strives to become more efficient, particularly through the use of technology, a need has arisen for nurses who understand both patient care and how technology can be used to improve care. With this increased use of technology, including the transition to personal health cards for all citizens by 2014, nurse informaticists who can translate technology into practice are in great demand.

“The need for a master’s degree concentration in nursing leadership and healthcare innovations is enormous. Nurse leaders are needed to implement innovative strategies for enhancing patient care outcomes and maximizing the use of technology in practice,” says Cece Grindel, associate director for graduate nursing.

The School of Nursing is working with Georgia State’s Institute of Health Administration to offer some of the coursework required in the new master’s program concentration. For more information on the degree program’s curriculum, visit http://chhs.gsu.edu/nursing/docs/HealthcareInnovationsCurr.pdf.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Sept. 11th Education Trust/Social Studies School Service Launch Free Resources to Address Call for Teaching About 9/11

/PRNewswire/ -- The following was issued today by Social Studies School Service and Sept. 11th Education Trust:

Who: The Sept. 11th Education Trust and Social Studies School Service

What: Free video-streaming Remembrance Video, Classroom Discussion Questions, and Website designed to share thoughts and questions.

Where: www.learnabout9-11.org, available August 31, 2009 - December 31, 2009

Why: The Sept. 11th Education Trust, a prominent 9/11 nonprofit organization, and Social Studies School Service, a leading provider of materials for K-12 schools, have created The Sept. 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum, the first comprehensive curriculum on the subject. They are making available for a limited time a free resource for teachers designed to spark an historical discussion about Sept. 11th. The video Remembrance features moving primary-source interviews with survivors, family members of those who perished and others who were a part of the events that transpired following the terrorist attacks. It comes with thoughtful discussion questions and may be used independently or as a starting point for teaching the entire curriculum.

"On Sept. 11, 2001 thousands of innocent civilians were attacked by terrorists on U.S. soil. Educators and parents need a resource that provides the tools to think critically about these historical events and to share information on a subject that affects us all," said Dr. Aaron Willis, Chief Education Officer for Social Studies School Service. "This Remembrance Video is a great way to start teaching The Sept. 11th Education Program curriculum, or it can be used independently to build understanding of this critical part of American history."

"Our driving force in creating this curriculum is to ensure that our future generations never forget the sacrifice thousands of individuals made at the hands of terrorists. By making this primary source video and the discussion questions available free of charge, we are helping students learn to think critically and civically," Anthony Gardner Founder and Director of The Sept. 11th Education Trust and brother of 9/11 victim, Harvey Joseph Gardner III.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page